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Loss of control precipitates tragic incidentsLoss of control precipitates tragic incidents

first_imgThe headline, in various ways citing “Teen dies after being struck to head by father”, dominated Guyana’s media last week.Just previous to that, a young woman was charged and remanded for stabbing her younger brother to death shortly after wounding her mother.A few days ago, a woman was reported to have stabbed herself during an altercation with her husband.There is seemingly no end in sight for these tragic occurrences, which are resultant upon emotional reactions to daily stresses. It is unlikely that these incidents occur as one-off episodes; but, rather an isolated event, may trigger off a fracas generated from cumulative stresses combining many factors.It is hardly likely that, in the normal course of things, a sister or father may want to kill a brother or a son. It takes great angst for a woman to drum up the courage to stab her own self.According to news reports, an argument between a father and son escalated to such an acrimonious level that 18-year-old Azeez Khan of Lot 8 Better Hope, East Coast Demerara (ECD) was struck to the head by his father with a piece of wood. He died while receiving medical attention.Allegedly, Azeez and his father, 40-year-old Omar Khan of the same address, were arguing over Azeez’s remonstrance to his sister because he objected to what the former considered inappropriate attire worn by a female member of his family. Apparently Omar objected to Azeez remonstrating with his daughter, and this ensued in a heated confrontation between father and son, at the height of which Omar is reported to have picked up a wood with which he lashed Azeez to his head, felling him to the ground. The young man subsequently succumbed to this one fatal blow.This one tragic occurrence has left a sister and daughter mourning a brother and a father, because, in effect, she has just lost both.Imagine the guilt she would be burdened with all her life, because she most likely would blame herself for the melee that precipitated such a tragic eventuality.The violent episodes that have led to murder have always devastated lives across the spectrum of relationships, yet these occurrences seem to be escalating in societies across the globe.When passions have cooled and the consequences of violent reactions to situations impact on the consciousness of perpetrators, the reality of the suffering they have caused to loved ones — making them also victims — may be a harsher punishment than whatever punitive measures the law may impose on them.These disturbances that eventuate into murderous melees are often caused by impaired senses, due to over-the-limit consumption of alcohol or usage of illicit and addictive drugs; or even as a consequence of uncontrollable anger due to a multiplicity of personal and societal stressors.Life in the olden days was much harder than what obtains today, with housewives having access to no labour-saving devices, children having no gizmos and gadgets, and fathers having no electrical or electronic appliances to make life an easy proposition; yet, the reactions to provocation were hardly ever violent, because — especially in rural communities — everyone looked out for his neighbour, and situations were never allowed to escalate to unmanageable proportions, because the entire neighbourhood would intervene and bring an end to the fracas almost immediately.Sadly today, Guyanese, once known for their caring and sharing within communities, have seemingly become inhuman to the point of enjoying the spectacle of violent confrontations between protagonists, filming rather than parting fights between children, and even creating and propagating the frictions that eventuate in tragic outcomes.last_img read more

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Manufacturing sector starved of incentives – GCCIManufacturing sector starved of incentives – GCCI

first_img– accounts for meagre economic performanceThe Georgetown Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GCCI) is calling for the Government to take a more proactive approach to revive the manufacturing sector, in light of that sector’s dismal contribution to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).Hosting his first press conference as President of GCCI, Deodat Indar made this call on Thursday at the chamber’s headquarters. According to Indar, there is little to no incentive for manufacturers to contribute to the Guyana economy.“There is little to nothing in terms of incentive (that) manufacturers get,” Indar said. “Look at the value of the GDP that manufacturers carry; it’s miniscule. We don’t even make a hammer in this country. So for us to really seriously think about manufacturing, we cannot have a seminar (for) a half-day (and expect we) would (be able to) look at all the top-of-the-line problems manufacturers have. We need to dig down in those issues.GCCI President Deodat Indar (centre) speaking to reporters“There are legal, incentive, cost (and) energy impediments. Energy represents a high part of cost — 10 to 15 (or) maybe 17 per cent; it ranges for different companies,” Indar explained.He said that if energy cost is reduced, the profit line for businesses would increase, and the investment would make a return. But referring to public companies in Guyana, he noted that there is a prevailing downturn.“Manufacturers need assistance,” Indar stressed. “And it must be done in a way that it is not bleeding the Government but at the same time that money is translated to cheaper goods for the consumers, so it carries down the cost of living.”ManufacturingWhen Government had released its end-of-year Outcome Report earlier this year, it showed even bleaker statistics on the nation’s manufacturing sector than Finance Minister Winston Jordan’s 2017 budget had projected. The report, which covers the year 2016, contains revised projections from those presented in budget 2017. It stated that the manufacturing sector contracted by 9.5 per cent, and not the 7.1 per cent Jordan had announced in November.The decline in the manufacturing sector was linked to the shrinking production in agriculture. The manufacturing sector is heavily dependent on sugar and rice production, a fact that Jordan had acknowledged last month at a press conference.“Very little manufacturing activity takes place in Guyana… The last (time) I looked at manufacturing without sugar and rice milling, (it contributed) a mere five per cent to GDP (Gross Domestic Product), which is very low,” Jordan had told journalists at the press conference.The Finance Ministry has revealed that, overall, the agriculture and fishing and forestry sectors had contracted by 10.4 per cent in 2016. According to the report, this is 0.9 per cent more than the rate projected at the time the 2017 Budget was presented.“Sugar production contracted even further than projected in November 2016, as the industry underestimated the negative impacts of late planting of the second crop on production.In addition, the late arrival of spare parts for factories negatively affected the processing stage of production,” the report revealed.At his 2016 end-of-year press conference, Agriculture Minister Noel Holder had explained that sugar production for the year had been plagued by poor labour turnout; lack of spares; equipment shortages, in particular cane punts; and factory breakdowns in the sector.He had also revealed that the shortage of skills and experience, in addition to underinvestment in the industry, was taking its toll.last_img read more

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Ground broken for downtown mega hotelGround broken for downtown mega hotel

first_imgMayor Antonio Villaraigosa said he is proud of the city’s role. “Someone asked me if I was chagrined about the city’s role,” Villaraigosa told a crowd of nearly 200 gathered to witness the groundbreaking. “Chagrined? I’m proud. When I look at this, I see the growth of downtown. I see jobs.” The project, developed by AEG as part of a complex of theaters, stores and entertainment venues, has endured a series of challenges over the past several years. It had gone through several financial partners until it recently made a deal with Wachovia Investments and MacFarlane Partners to offset costs. It is being financed through Credit Suisse. The site will feature a 124-room Ritz Carlton hotel as well as 850 rooms to be operated by Marriott Hotels. It also will have more than 200 condominiums for sale. More than 100 of the condos have already been sold, including one to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. AEG President Tim Leiweke said the hotel is the biggest project his company – which owns Staples Center – has undertaken, and plans are to make it the center of awards shows from around the nation. “We are not talking about taking shows from the Shrine Auditorium or any other facility in Los Angeles,” Leiweke said. “We’re talking about going after New York and Miami and Las Vegas. This is the entertainment capital of the world and there is no reason for a movie premiere to be in any other city.” Leiweke said the organization already has signed a deal to serve as host for multiple award shows put on by Billboard Magazine, including Latin and country and western music. “If you think these don’t mean anything, the Grammy Awards bring in $50 million to $100 million for the one or two weeks they are here,” Leiweke said. Schwarzenegger, the former movie strongman who joked that he wanted to have a new premiere for his 1970 film “Hercules in New York,” said the project is a symbol of investors’ renewed confidence in California. “We passed billions in bond issues to improve the infrastructure and now we see private companies investing in areas like downtown,” he said. Carol Schatz of the Central City Association, who has been working on the project for years, said the hotel will bring tourists and local residents downtown. “We have met the mark when it comes to housing,” Schatz said. “For the first time in decades, you see people pushing baby carriages and walking their dogs. This hotel will bring more investment and more people to the downtown area.” Bill Marriott of Marriott Hotel Corp. said he hopes the hotel rises to the promises. “Hotels prosper if there is an active environment and someplace for people to go on weekends,” Marriott said. “With the hotel and l.a. live, we will see that.” Officials estimate that the project will create 25,000 permanent jobs and more than 7,500 jobs during construction. When completed, the site will bring together a 7,100-seat live-performance theater, a 2,200-seat club, a 14-screen cineplex and broadcast facilities for ESPN. There also are plans for restaurants and other venues, including a bowling alley and a Grammy museum. rick.orlov@dailynews.com (213) 978-0390160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! A string quartet played and a crystal chandelier hung precariously from a crane as local officials marked the start of construction Friday for a Convention Center headquarters hotel they hope will be a catalyst for future downtown development. The 54-story, $4.5 billion project – funded with nearly $300 million in city investments – will become a mainstay of a new downtown Los Angeles, officials promised, bringing about a long-sought Renaissance merging sports, entertainment, tourism and business. “We have been working on this for so long that it’s hard to put in words what I feel today,” said Councilwoman Jan Perry, who represents the area and was a key figure in negotiating the city’s involvement in the l.a. live deal. The controversial deal includes funds from the Community Redevelopment Agency and a reinvestment of hotel bed taxes over the next 20 years. last_img read more

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Benfica will demand £52MILLION to sell starlet wanted by Arsenal and Man UnitedBenfica will demand £52MILLION to sell starlet wanted by Arsenal and Man United

first_img1 Goncalo Guedes in action for Benfica Arsenal and Manchester United will have to splash out a huge sum to sign Benfica wonderkid Goncalo Guedes.The 19-year-old has impressed during his 31 appearances in the Portuguese top-flight and the race is on to sign him.And according to A Bola, it is Premier League duo Arsenal and United who are currently the most likely clubs to prise the attacker away from Benfica.However, Benfica are in no rush to sell the teenager and are likely to hold out for his entire contracted release clause.That would mean one of his admirers stumping up a huge £52.7m to sign a largely unproven prospect.last_img

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A fair shareA fair share

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2Seeing that the city has lavished a similar subsidy on the planned Convention Center hotel – and that developers of a massive hotel in the Grand Avenue Project have sought the same deal – Greuel’s plan only seems fair. For years, targeted tax breaks have been used to boost downtown while Valley taxpayers have borne the burden of paying for city government. And for decades, the Valley has received a proportionally smaller share of city services, despite paying a proportionally higher share of the costs. So it’s the Valley’s turn, or at least it should be. And beefing up tourism would be a good way to boost the local economy. Already, due to its proximity to various entertainment and business venues, the Valley accounts for 17 percent of the city’s hospitality business – and that’s with little promotion. There are also many other possible uses for the cash – such as helping to meet the Valley’s pressing road, transit and policing needs, the products of a half-century of city neglect. LOS Angeles City Councilwoman Wendy Greuel has called for a proposal that would create equity in city tax policies, boost business in the San Fernando Valley and give Vals a better return on their taxes. Which is to say, the plan probably has too much going for it to get passed by the full council. Nonetheless, this is an idea the council ought to take seriously, because if it passes – and even more so if doesn’t – that will tell us a lot about City Hall’s priorities. What Greuel proposes is that the revenues from bed taxes at Valley hotels stop going into the city’s general coffers, but to LA Inc., which works to bring tourism to the city. LA Inc. , in turn, would work with the San Fernando Valley Conference and Visitors Bureau to bring tourists and business travelers to the Valley. It would be refreshing to see the city, having taken such good care of downtown, extend the same kind of attention to the Valley. But don’t count on it.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Rovers goalkeeper named in Irish U19 squadRovers goalkeeper named in Irish U19 squad

first_imgGoalkeeper Edward McGinty signs his first pro deal with Sligo Rovers boss Gerard Lyttle.Sligo Rovers goalkeeper Edward McGinty has been named in the Irish U19 squad for two games against Romania in Spain next week.Head coach Tom Mohan has selected a squad of 20 players including the Ballyshannon native, who signed his first professional deal with the Bit O’ Red last summer.The two games will give Mohan the opportunity to fine-tune his preparations for next month’s UEFA European Under-19 Championship Elite Round, where Ireland will take on Kosovo, Portugal and Slovakia for a place in the tournament proper.Mohan is looking forward to the Romanian challenge. “It’s our last opportunity before the Elite Round to get a look at players.“Obviously we are missing a number of players so that opens the door for other lads to come in and stake their claim for a place. Some of the guys have taken the opportunity they’ve been given in pre-season domestically and have done really well.”Republic of Ireland U19 manager Tom Mohan. Photo by Sam Barnes/Sportsfile.Coming off the back of a top place finish in the Qualifying Round, Mohan is keen to use the upcoming matches to keep that momentum going.  “Any time you get a squad in you have to make the most of it. Romania topped their group in qualifying, they’ll be tough opponents and that is what you want.“We want our players tested at the highest level before the Elite Round because it is a very competitive stage and that is exactly what these two games will give us,” he said.Ireland’s opening game in Spain takes place on Tuesday.Republic of Ireland Under-19 SquadGoalkeepers: Brian Maher (St Patrick’s Athletic), Edward McGinty (Sligo Rovers), Rory Brown (Wolverhampton Wanderers)Defenders: Lee O’Connor (Manchester United), Dara O’Shea (Hereford United – on loan from West Bromwich Albion), James Finnerty (Aston Villa), Callum Cockerill-Mollett (Walsall), Canice Carroll (Oxford United), Callum Nicell (Leeds United), Daniel McKenna (Bray Wanderers – on loan from Wolverhampton Wanderers)Midfielders: Rian O’Sullivan (Brighton & Hove Albion), Kian Flanagan (Crystal Palace), Cieran Dunne (Falkirk), Owen Wall (Wexford), Rowan Roache (Blackpool), Anthony Scully (West Ham United)Forwards: Aidan Keena (Queens Park – on loan from Hearts), Matthew Shiels (Rangers), Luke Heeney (St Patrick’s Athletic), Aaron Dobbs (Wexford)FixturesFebruary 13: Republic of Ireland v Romania, La Manga, Spain, KO14:00February 15: Republic of Ireland v Romania, La Manga, Spain, KO11:00last_img read more

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A Waynesville Woman Is Behind BarsA Waynesville Woman Is Behind Bars

first_imgA Waynesville woman is behind bars after being arrested driving an allegedly stolen vehicle and assaulting an officer. Tammy Smith Gibson, 37, was arrested on June 24 after she was allegedly seen in possession of a stolen 2018 GMC Canyon. Court documents note that instead of complying with the Haywood County Sheriff’s deputy trying to make the arrest, Gibson instead ran away and tried to fight the deputy.last_img

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New drive to fight polio in AfricaNew drive to fight polio in Africa

first_imgMore than 85 million children under the age of five in West and Central Africa will receive polio vaccinations. (Image: www.academic.sun.ac.za)A massive campaign to eradicate a year-long polio epidemic in West and Central Africa kicked off on 6 March, according to global health bodies.The organisations, joining forces as the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI), are hoping to immunise more than 85-million children under the age of five in 19 West and Central African countries. GPEI includes governments, the World Health Organisation (WHO), Rotary International, the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and Unicef.The campaign kicked off in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Senegal and Sierra Leone – countries that have experienced polio outbreaks in the last six months – as well as in Nigeria, Ghana, Benin, Central African Republic, Gambia, Cape Verde and Guinea Bissau.Vaccinations in Niger, Togo and Cote d’Ivoire will be done at a later date due to impending elections in those states.The scope of the new campaign is significant because previous attempts in 2009 failed to reach enough children, and so the outbreak persisted.Over 400 000 volunteers and health workers from different organisations have been called on to administer two drops of the oral polio vaccine (OPV) to each child in the 19 countries on 6 March. The “dedicated army” will work for about 12 hours flat, going to every household on either foot, bicycle, car, boat or motorcycle.“With better coverage that leaves no child unvaccinated, these campaigns can succeed in making West and Central Africa polio-free,” Unicef regional director Dr Gianfranco Rotigliano said in a statement released on 4 March.“Hundreds of volunteers from our Red Cross and Red Crescent National Societies will ensure that polio drops reach every last child,” said Anders Naucler, health coordinator for the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies in West and Central Africa. “That is our challenge and that will be the measure of our success.”Building immunityVaccinations will be repeated in the 19 countries on 24 April, but children in Burkina Faso, Guinea, Liberia, Mauritania, Senegal and Sierra Leone – where the recent outbreaks have occurred – will receive an additional dose on 26 March as part of a new Short Interval Additional Dose strategy “that has proven successful in rapidly building population immunity where needed”, according to Unicef.The new campaign is an aspect of an ongoing initiative to fight the epidemic that broke out in Nigeria in 2008. It then spread to its neighbouring countries, which were previously polio-free, and to Central Africa, said GPEI.After battling to contain the spread, health organisations, working with health ministries in the affected countries, introduced new approaches which include a scheme to monitor how many children have been reached, better training for vaccinators and appropriate use of experienced staff.Dr Luis Gomes Sambo, WHO regional director for Africa, said the campaign shows Africa’s determination to be free of polio. “From the top leadership to local district administrators in every country we are each accountable to the African child. [We have] to vaccinate every child and achieve high coverage.”Funding from RotaryRotary International, which boasts about 1.2-million volunteers worldwide, has donated US$30-million (R223-million) to fund the campaign.“We are proud to have provided the funding necessary for the March rounds and we call on others to play their part in making Africa polio-free by providing funding necessary for more high-coverage campaigns,” said Ambroise Tshimbalanga-Kasongo, who chairs the organisation’s Africa Regional PolioPlus Committee.last_img read more

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Student from Nunavut died of drowning say Kingston policeStudent from Nunavut died of drowning say Kingston police

first_imgAPTN National NewsKINGSTON–Police in Kingston, Ont. have determined Ken Kilabuk died of drowning but still don’t know if it suspicious.An autopsy performed in Ottawa, Ont. Monday confirmed the cause of death.Kilabuk was found Saturday on shore of the Cataraqui River near downtown Kingston.Kilabuk, a Nunavut man, was last seen the night of Oct. 15 and was reported missing. He had been attending St. Lawrence College.Police said it is still too soon determine if Kilabuk’s death is suspicious. Detectives are still trying to determine his whereabouts between Oct. 15 and when his body was found washed up on the shore.last_img

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FROM THE FIELD Keeping hope alive in MogadishuFROM THE FIELD Keeping hope alive in Mogadishu

23 December 2011It is a hot, dusty morning in Mogadishu, the war-ravaged capital of Somalia, and Ahmed Farah Roble is in a makeshift settlement for internally displaced persons (IDPs), listening to a mother tell him about her baby daughter. Ahmed nods patiently, asks questions and listens attentively. He is in the camp to meet with its representatives, to learn more about their situation. Many have recently arrived from the country’s south, fleeing hunger and conflict. They have very little, and urgently need food and medicine, shelter and health care. It is hard not to be affected by what he sees and hears, especially as the 45-year-old was born and raised in Mogadishu. As the longest-serving UN humanitarian affairs officer in the capital, Ahmed has heard many similar heart-breaking tales before. “But it is painful, still. I can say that, before, this was a peaceful city. It was paradise. Now, these people living here have lost everything, their property, opportunities for education. There are not enough health services. There is no safe drinking water in some areas,” he says. “I’m one of those who was here in the golden days, when the situation was good. These last 20 years, when the country was devastated by endless and continuous conflict, it is really painful for me.” Ahmed Farah Roble and UNHCR staff see first-hand the conditions at IDP settlement in Mogadishu, Somalia.For much of the past four years, through some of Mogadishu’s heaviest fighting, he was the lone man on the ground for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) – the part of the UN responsible for bringing together humanitarian groups to ensure a coherent response to emergencies. The situation has been so dangerous that, until recently, OCHA was unable to deploy more staff to join him. “It was not an easy task to work here then,” says Ahmed. “All of the humanitarian community was targeted, no matter whether they were international or national. You could be targeted, kidnapped and killed at any time.”“It was a critical time, and even for me it was very difficult to get access to the people most in need.” National staff members like Ahmed make up more than 90 per cent of humanitarian workers around the world, working on the frontlines. Too often, they bear the brunt of violence, as illustrated today with the deaths of two staff members of the UN World Food Programme (WFP) and a colleague working for a partner organization in central Somalia. The dangers of working in Somalia, and restricted access for internationals, have led to a greater reliance on national staff, as well as local partners. “International staff bring a wealth of technical experience to this crisis, but the role played by national staff is just as important,” says Marcel Stoessel, the head of OCHA’s sub-office in Mogadishu. “After all, nobody knows Somalia better than the Somalis – and without the local expertise of our national colleagues, international staff couldn’t do their jobs.” “National staff speak the local language and often some local dialects as well, so they can more easily interact with people. They also understand the clan structure in Somalia, which is important if one wants to be successful in this humanitarian operation. They help us make crucial links with the government. “Last, but not least, it’s much safer for them to move around Mogadishu than it is for international staff. People like Ahmed are our ‘humanitarian eyes and ears’.” Ahmed’s family is in a neighbouring country for safety. For much of the time that he has been in Mogadishu, the city has been riven by a fluid frontline dividing the two sides – fighters belonging to the Islamist militant Al-Shabaab movement and troops belonging to the Transitional Federal Government (TFG). Ahmed Farah Roble speaks with a Somali NGO representative while in the Mogadishu sub-office.The violence worsened the already dire humanitarian situation for the city’s existing residents, and well as the many new people who sought help and refuge there after famine struck parts of the south in mid-2011. Since Al-Shabaab’s withdrawal from the central parts of Mogadishu in August, the frontlines have been pushed back to the city’s outskirts – but the situation is still far from secure. The use of roadside bombs, grenades and suicide bombers is a regular occurrence, and on the rise. “The scale-up of humanitarian aid has done a lot for the situation here. Malnutrition rates and mortality rates have dropped, and access is better in some places – so I have been able to visit various IDP settlements. But there is a need for more help,” Ahmed says. “I see it and hear it all the time.” Heading back to his car to make his way to the OCHA sub-office is no easy feat. IDPs try to grab his attention with every step. Finally back at his desk, now populated with two new national colleagues and three international colleagues, Ahmed starts preparing a report on what he has heard and seen during his visit. The report will inform OCHA and its partners about the humanitarian needs of that IDP settlement, allowing the humanitarian system to direct essential aid to its residents. “I have the sense of a humanitarian. That’s a real driving force which helps me to forget everything, especially when I feel so far from my family, when I am doing this night and day. I’m just happy that I am doing a good thing.” read more

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